Choosing a Sysytem

cuetipper

Registered
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
I am a BCA member and normally have a decent game. Though at times I can run six racks and others not three balls. Through some reflection I believe the issue is with my aiming. I simply don't. When the stars align I shoot like god, but if i'm tired or preoccupied I am way off.

I have never taking a class or had instruction mostly as where I live there is no one I trust to be of help. So I would like to try an aiming system. I know that no one system is the be all of pool but lord help me there are SO MANY to choose from.

I would appreciate some opinions on which to choose if I am to choose one!
 

Patrick Johnson

Fish of the Day
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
I am a BCA member and normally have a decent game. Though at times I can run six racks and others not three balls. Through some reflection I believe the issue is with my aiming. I simply don't. When the stars align I shoot like god, but if i'm tired or preoccupied I am way off.

I have never taking a class or had instruction mostly as where I live there is no one I trust to be of help. So I would like to try an aiming system. I know that no one system is the be all of pool but lord help me there are SO MANY to choose from.

I would appreciate some opinions on which to choose if I am to choose one!
None are better or worse than others - whatever one "talks to" you. Here's a thread about a few of them: Basic Aiming Methods Illustrated.

pj
chgo
 

BC21

Poolology
Rating - 100%
2   0   0
I agree somewhat with PJ.... choose one that "talks" to you. I disagree with his statement that "none are
better or worse than others". Once you try a few you'll see that's not exactly true. Choose one that you feel is easy to implement, easy to visualize, and doesn't require a ton of guesswork or trial and error (hitting a million balls) before you get it working well.

You might find one system or method works well for you on certain shots but not so well on other shots. If you're only looking for something to help on backcuts, for instance, then you might find Poolology very helpful. And maybe another system will improve other shots. A player's aiming skill is often a mixed bag of several methods combined with many hours of repetition and development .
 
Last edited:

jason

Unprofessional everything
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
times I can run six racks and others not three balls.

Sounds to me like your current aiming system (whatever that is) works just fine. I would not suggest tampering with too many aiming systems. I believe your instincts are good and you should trust them. Deeper concentration I believe is the answer you're looking for. The game is about focus.
 

duckie

GregH
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
I am a BCA member and normally have a decent game. Though at times I can run six racks and others not three balls. Through some reflection I believe the issue is with my aiming. I simply don't. When the stars align I shoot like god, but if i'm tired or preoccupied I am way off.

I have never taking a class or had instruction mostly as where I live there is no one I trust to be of help. So I would like to try an aiming system. I know that no one system is the be all of pool but lord help me there are SO MANY to choose from.

I would appreciate some opinions on which to choose if I am to choose one!

Until you can figure why you missed......no system will help. You are doing something right.......so what did you do wrong on the shots you missed.

Is it a certain type shot, stroke issue, not a comfy shooting position, where the shot is located on the table and so on.

Then practice that whatever is giving you issues.
 

Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Rating - 100%
15   0   0
... Though at times I can run six racks and others not three balls. Through some reflection I believe the issue is with my aiming. ...
I don't think you need a different way to aim if at times you run six racks. You probably need a better pre-shot routine. That can help with consistency.

As far as choosing an aiming system to work with, I think that some are really bad. See the recent thread I started on the "nearest/farthest" method. But even with that system, which is horribly, pitifully broken, one responder said it was very helpful for him.

Any aiming system might help to an extent because it forces you to actually look at the shot. So does a pre-shot routine. I think you need to look at and visualize each shot.
 

BC21

Poolology
Rating - 100%
2   0   0
I don't think you need a different way to aim if at times you run six racks. You probably need a better pre-shot routine. That can help with consistency.

As far as choosing an aiming system to work with, I think that some are really bad. See the recent thread I started on the "nearest/farthest" method. But even with that system, which is horribly, pitifully broken, one responder said it was very helpful for him.

Any aiming system might help to an extent because it forces you to actually look at the shot. So does a pre-shot routine. I think you need to look at and visualize each shot.


Excellent advice. I suffer from a lazy psr due to occasional lack of focus. It's amazing how poorly I can play on occasion, yet equally as amazing at how great I can play other times. It all falls back on the psr, on focus, for every single shot. And when your mind isn't in the game, that stuff seems to be a million miles away.
 
Last edited:

BC21

Poolology
Rating - 100%
2   0   0
If there is a pre shot routine........what’s the shot routine ......what’s the post shot routine?

I would define those terms like this....



Pre Shot Routine -- Involves everything you should do before executing the shot. This includes chalking your tip, studying the layout, determining where the cb needs to go for position on the next shot, determining where the cb needs to be in order to pocket the ob, visualizing all of this, aligning your body/stance, etc....

Shot Routine -- The actual execution of the shot, from practice strokes to the final backswing and delivery stroke, staying down and watching the ob drop into the pocket before raising up.

Post Shot Routine -- Check that everything went as planned. If so, don't pat yourself on the back or start thinking you've already won. Just go to the next shot and begin the Pre Shot Routine for that shot. If things didn't work out as smoothly as planned, don't beat yourself up. Don't get mad and whine like a spoiled kid. Don't be a nit either. Stay calm, smile if you can, and study your options. When you decide what you want or need to do, move into the Pre Shot Routine and get it done.
 
Last edited:

BilliardsAbout

BondFanEvents.com
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
I am a BCA member and normally have a decent game. Though at times I can run six racks and others not three balls. Through some reflection I believe the issue is with my aiming. I simply don't. When the stars align I shoot like god, but if i'm tired or preoccupied I am way off.

I have never taking a class or had instruction mostly as where I live there is no one I trust to be of help. So I would like to try an aiming system. I know that no one system is the be all of pool but lord help me there are SO MANY to choose from.

I would appreciate some opinions on which to choose if I am to choose one!

Here are some of my opinions. Thanks for asking!

1) Don't listen to the naysayers (who mostly aim by instinct and assume the world revolves around their personal pool game skills). There are very fine aim systems available--although some instructors teach aim by instinct, and others, poor aim systems.

2) Start with what pros do--I teach what pros do, many of their competencies can be absorbed by amateurs. How do most pros aim? They pick out a spot on the object ball "and send the cue ball there". This is their aim by instinct rubric.

3) So now we can safely discard ghost ball and fractions, and for most shots, ball edges, pivoting the cue stick, etc. You need a stance that gets your head/eyes in the same place relative to every shot. You need to have a simple aim system that is focused on the patch on the object ball for cue ball contact--not empty space near the ball or a distant rail, not a "visible edge" of the object ball, but a real place on a real object, along or near the object ball's equator.

The trick is with stance, therefore, as much as aim. You need to first eye the shot at hand from standing erect properly, without a tilted or rotated head, feet together. Then you need to walk into the stance without compromising your good head/eyes position.

For me and for most students (whose vision doesn't force them to stand so that the cue is far off line), this means 1) straddle the shortest line between cue ball and object ball, head level, chest perpendicular to this line, to eye the shot/assess the contact point on the o.b. then 2) step with the right foot relative to the line so that the vision center/line of sight is over this line 3) move the left foot for balance and lower into the stance.

Start there. I'm happy to help you further on this thread or via PM.
 

goettlicher

AzB Silver Member
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
I am a BCA member and normally have a decent game. Though at times I can run six racks and others not three balls. Through some reflection I believe the issue is with my aiming. I simply don't. When the stars align I shoot like god, but if i'm tired or preoccupied I am way off.

I have never taking a class or had instruction mostly as where I live there is no one I trust to be of help. So I would like to try an aiming system. I know that no one system is the be all of pool but lord help me there are SO MANY to choose from.

I would appreciate some opinions on which to choose if I am to choose one!



I can offer you a visual aiming system called AUTO AIM.
I am located in Dallas, Texas.

randyg
 

measureman

AzB Silver Member
Rating - 100%
1   0   0
If you can run 6 racks and other times not run 3 balls this just doesn't sound right.
I can run and have run multiple racks of all the popular games and have never had a day in 60 years of playing where I couldn't run 3 balls.
 

AimPro Billiards

Registered
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
I am a BCA member and normally have a decent game. Though at times I can run six racks and others not three balls. Through some reflection I believe the issue is with my aiming. I simply don't. When the stars align I shoot like god, but if i'm tired or preoccupied I am way off.

I have never taking a class or had instruction mostly as where I live there is no one I trust to be of help. So I would like to try an aiming system. I know that no one system is the be all of pool but lord help me there are SO MANY to choose from.

I would appreciate some opinions on which to choose if I am to choose one!

Let's assume for the moment that you are right, that it's an aiming problem. Focus is vital, but assume it's not that. Then it's likely that your head/eye alignment/height over the ball is off. The suggestions of Bob and Matt and others about preshot routine should help. Give special focus to head/eye alignment, tilt and height. A key check is if you can focus on the hit, on shots you are missing [but a good habit all the time]. Are you hitting where you are aiming? Even with no conscious aiming system, you must have something you use as reference to tell if the cue ball is going to where you intended. If you are hitting where you are 'aiming' when you miss, then we're confirming focus and an aiming problem.

You should also pay some attention to your eye patterns. Perhaps you are inconsistent and do a poor pattern on days you are distracted. Eye patterns have to do with where you look as you do warmup strokes and on the final shot. There are a few recommended variations.

And I hope you aren't jumping up or otherwise moving during or in the first second after the shot. Small changes here are disastrous for consistency.

I can suggest my aiming video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gCvaLS37FDo) as a way to give you some insights about the tradeoffs of the most common aiming systems. That theory as well as trying them out -- especially on shots that are their weak areas that I point out, should help you choose. I generally align when standing, based on my estimation of the ghost ball position, but I strongly agree with Matt that you need some exact aim point on the object ball for precision when you are down on the shot.

But I also firmly believe that learning aiming requires good fundamentals and the overall learning process involves both. And it's best to practice known shots with known aims. Inconsistency in that case means a mechanics problem. My AimRight product gives a good way to setup known shots and in the video I recommend a way to aim during that 'mechanics' training that aims at an exact spot on the OB, as Matt advises. If you want to evaluate an aiming system, I strongly recommend you test it out rigorously with a full range of cut angles and at various distances. People can be fooled by intermittent/short-term success that they've found something that will solve all their problems.

But what if it's not aiming? Certainly focus and preshot routines and mental attitude are critical. But I don't know if you are a pure shotmaker or play a strong all-around game. If you are a pure shotmaker, perhaps you need to learn better position play and/or pattern play to not have to frequently shoot difficult shots. If you play a strong all around game, then your failure to run many balls points to problems with fundamentals and maybe aiming.

One final thought. If you aren't 'into playing' because other things are important/distracting, maybe you shouldn't play that day. Playing then reinforces bad habits and just isn't fun. Or practice something different like learning a kick shot method or safety play. Something new will grab your attention in a way unlike 'regular play'. And if you must play (league, for example), try playing more conservatively, like much more safety play.
 

straightline

AzB Silver Member
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
Do Robots Argue Aiming Systems ?

Just wondering. I'm not selling anything, so do what works for you. This should include your own debugging.

Back to robots: I think the only sensible routine is to centralize the process by determining the actual geometric orientation of the balls. (see Contact Points etc...) no degrees necessary.

Cut to / you actually did that. Now that you have a good idea of what the shot actually IS, learn to shoot that.
 

born2push

AzB Silver Member
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
I am a BCA member and normally have a decent game. Though at times I can run six racks and others not three balls. Through some reflection I believe the issue is with my aiming. I simply don't. When the stars align I shoot like god, but if i'm tired or preoccupied I am way off.



I have never taking a class or had instruction mostly as where I live there is no one I trust to be of help. So I would like to try an aiming system. I know that no one system is the be all of pool but lord help me there are SO MANY to choose from.



I would appreciate some opinions on which to choose if I am to choose one!
I can tell you the issue is probably not aiming. Although their may be times you aren't seeing the balls as well as when you're on your game. When this occurs you may find that you are moving ever so slightly when delivering the cue wich throws off the stroke. Shoot some long straight in shots (no aiming reqiired) and see if you're in stroke. Make sure not to move anything but the stroking arm.

Sent from my SM-A205U using Tapatalk
 

jokrswylde

AzB Silver Member
Rating - 100%
1   0   0
Here are some of my opinions. Thanks for asking!


2) Start with what pros do--I teach what pros do, many of their competencies can be absorbed by amateurs. How do most pros aim? They pick out a spot on the object ball "and send the cue ball there". This is their aim by instinct rubric.

What spot do they pick and how do they pick it? That, to me, is the rub. I have taken a couple lessons, am pretty consistent with doing my Mother drills and repeating my stroke mantra and all that, and typically practice 15+ hours a week.

I feel I am developing an internal "shot library", where I see a cut angle and "know" where to aim to pocket the ball. But man is it slow going. I will often use ghostball to get me in the right zip code, and maybe use some poology just to confirm that "yes this is a quarter ball hit". (I haven't given Poology enough table to not get frustrated when the OB fraction is, say, 3/5 instead of a true half ball hit)

Typically, if I am dead set on making a ball, it will go in. My problem is that I don't have the mental focus to treat every. single. ball. like it was the winning ball. I will see a shot, think to myself, " oh, this is for sure a 30 degree cut" get down and fire and miss. When, if I would have taken my time and FOCUSED, I would have realized it was slightly more or less than a 30 degree cut and made the adjustment.

To me, that is what makes run out players so awe inspiring. The mental focus it takes to not get sloppy and miss silly shots.
 

Patrick Johnson

Fish of the Day
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
What spot do they pick and how do they pick it? That, to me, is the rub.
I find it easy to see the spot on the OB I want to hit - the one directly opposite where I want the OB to go. Hitting that spot with the CB isn't a gimme, but having that target to work with has made the learning-to-aim journey much easier for me.

pj
chgo
 
Top